Sunday, December 30, 2007

Can You Write a Script?

View the video below.







Could you write a script for a slide show like this? Is this something you would like to do?

Saturday, December 22, 2007

What can you bring to school?

What are things that we should be allowed to bring to school? Should you be allowed to bring MP3 players, guitars, calculators, cell phones, pets, or other playthings?

In order to construct your argument, you must begin with your statement:

“I think we should be allowed to bring horses to school.”

Then you must support your statement:

“Horses will allow us to get from class to class quicker.”

“Horses are nice, so they will keep us happy.”

Then you must think of the reasons others might give when they disagree:

“Horses are very big.”

“Horses can bite students and teachers.”

“Who will clean up after them?”

Respond to these reasons before they can be given:

“I know that horses are very big, but my plan uses Shetland ponies that are very small. Shetland ponies are very gentle animals, but to be sure that no students are bitten we plan to place muzzles on them. There is also the issue of the mess they will make, I have found a company that will come in and clean up after them and sell the mess for fertilizer. They will actually pay us for this. This money will then be used to care for the animal’s needs at school.”

Conclude with a positive closing:

“I feel that I have made a good case for bringing horses to school. I think you can see what a positive effect on teachers, students, and the school horses will bring. I appreciate your time and consideration.”

For extra credit, write a persuasive letter (this link provides an excellent example) to Mr. Lawslo that outlines your argument for what you think should be allowed in school. Imagine that you are a lawyer and Mr. Lawslo is a judge; make your case. The best argument will get $500 added directly to their account, but all students that participate will receive 20 points.

What Makes Writing So Important?

Writing is the primary basis upon which your work, your learning, and your intellect will be judged—in college, in the workplace, and in the community.

Writing expresses who you are as a person.

Writing is portable and permanent. It makes your thinking visible.

Writing helps you move easily among facts, inferences, and opinions without getting confused—and without confusing your reader.

Writing promotes your ability to pose worthwhile questions.

Writing fosters your ability to explain a complex position to readers, and to yourself.

Writing helps others give you feedback.

Writing helps you refine your ideas when you give others feedback.

Writing requires that you anticipate your readers’ needs. Your ability to do so demonstrates your intellectual flexibility and maturity.

Writing ideas down preserves them so that you can reflect upon them later.

Writing out your ideas permits you to evaluate the adequacy of your argument.

Writing stimulates you to extend a line of thought beyond your first impressions or gut responses.

Writing helps you understand how truth is established in a given discipline.

Writing equips you with the communication and thinking skills you need to participate effectively in democracy.

Writing is an essential job skill.



~based upon brochures from Brown University
and the University of Missouri

Wednesday, December 19, 2007

Akhenaten: The Rebel Pharaoh

Akhenaten has been called the most original religious thinker the ancient world had ever seen. Is this true? Analyze and compare the teachings of other significant religious figures and make a determination. What makes Akhenaten’s message original?

Here are some simpler instructions to answering this question:
  1. Write 2 paragraphs outlining the beliefs of Akhenaten regarding Aten, monotheism, and Truth.
  2. Do the same thing (substituting the deity of each for Aten) for two of the following:
    a. Buddha
    b. Jesus
    c. Laozi (Daoism)
    e. Mohammed
    f. Moses
    g. Zoroaster
  3. Then compare and contrast their beliefs.
  4. Finally, ask yourself if Akhenaten was an original thinker based upon his willingness to discard the polytheism that was prevalent in Egypt at the time. Did these others step out further from accepted thinking with their beliefs? Remember that original means the first. How unique is the thinking of each individual.
  5. Write a short essay describing your findings.

Sunday, December 16, 2007

Weekly Schedule December 17th – December 21st

This is our schedule for the week ending December 21st, 2007. It is important to remember that these schedules are not etched in stone. Our firm belief in adjusting our curriculum to meet the needs of students sometimes causes slight changes. It is important to note that ample time is given in class to complete most assignments. There are occasional projects, spanning a week or more, that will require students to work outside of class. There will be no more than one of these per month. If you have any questions, please contact me at extension 38.

1st Year Social Studies (Period 1 & 3) – This week we will continue our study of the colonies. Students should be finishing their biography of one of the following people: John Smith, William Penn, Lord Baltimore, Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson, or James Oglethorpe. The biography must be typed, Times New Roman font, double spaced, with standard margins, and is due Thursday December 20th.

Monday: We will be studying the Southern Colonies. The Southern Colonies of Virginia, Maryland, Georgia, and North and South Carolina were very distinct from England’s other American colonies because their economic success was based on slave labor. This program tells the stories of these colonies. Beginning with England’s first attempts at colonization on Roanoke Island in the 1580s, this program examines the motivations for founding each southern colony. The problems colonists faced in settling new territory and interactions with American Indians are detailed. The role of slavery, conflicts with Spain, colonial exports, and methods of government are also examined. There will be two worksheets and a short quiz.

Tuesday: We will be studying the circumstances that led to America proclaiming independence. Taxation without representation emerged as the central issue of conflict between the colonies and Great Britain. The Boston Tea Party, the Quartering Acts, the Townshend Acts, Committees of Correspondence, the First Continental Congress, the Boston Massacre and the Intolerable Acts contributed to the American Revolution, a revolution that signaled the birth of the first new nation in modern history, and became a sign of hope for our country and for people throughout the world seeking freedom. There will be a short quiz.

Wednesday: We will be studying the Declaration of Independence. Our discussion will explain not only the basic principles and concepts set forth in the Declaration of Independence, but we will also explore the valiant American leaders, their ideas, and the historical events that spurred them to declare independence from England in 1776. There will be a short quiz.

Thursday: We will be taking our colonization unit test. After the test we will, time permitting, view Unsolved History: The Boston Massacre. For 200 years, Americans have been misled about the circumstances surrounding the Boston Massacre. Now, see why British troops accosted by an unruly mob fired on colonists in self-defense. Part of Discovery Channel's "Unsolved History" series, which takes a detailed forensic approach to some of history's most vexing mysteries via a painstaking examination of photographs, artifacts and interviews from experts and eyewitnesses.

2nd Year Social Studies (Period 2 & 4) – We will be studying Ancient Egypt.

Monday: We will view “Great Egyptians.” Gender, age, and cunning were behind three of ancient Egypt's most intriguing rulers — and left indelible marks on the history of the country. Hatshepsut: Queen Who Became King — She declared herself King of Egypt and got away with it. Peek into her incredibly successful 22-year reign. Tutankhamen: Mystery of the Boy King — Victim of foul play? What happened to the 11-year-old king whose life was a clash between childhood and kingship? Cleopatra: Last of the Pharaohs — Discover how Cleopatra used shrewd political instincts to seduce the Roman Empire into restoring Egypt's greatness. We will decide “Who Killed King Tut?”

Tuesday: Meet Akhenaten, who brought dramatic change to Egypt with his slogan, "Living in Truth." We will do a little detective work to shore up a tale of power and intrigue in one of the world's oldest whodunits. We will also be discussing how Akenaten may have laid the foundation for modern monotheism.

Wednesday: We will study Ramses the Great. This man clearly was concerned with posterity: he built more monuments and fathered more children during his reign than any other pharaoh. We will view some of Ramses' legacies, including the massive figures at Abu Simbel that inspired Mount Rushmore. Then examine a key battle Ramses may have lost — the one with Moses and the God of the Israelites. Judge for yourself how well archaeological evidence supports the events described in Exodus.

Thursday: We will look further into the correlations between the archaeological accounts and the Bible’s of the Exodus of the Israelites.

Health –

Friday: We will be watching Alvin and the Chipmunks at Movies Havasu.

Saturday, December 15, 2007

Telesis Blog

Students,
There are a number of new blogs out there for you to look at. Look under student links to find many new teacher's blogs. One I want you all to look at is the Telesis blog. I have just posted some questions that I would LOVE for you to respond to. Yes, extra credit does apply!

Wednesday, December 12, 2007

Projects Due December 20th

Don't forget about your project!!!!!

Telesis Girls Teach Lesson in Courage

Yesterday was my birthday and it wasn't until Friday that I finally figured out what I wanted.
Just the other day I took an online quiz, and one of the questions was what character from the Wizard of Oz am I most like. I thought I was a perfect fit for the scarecrow, but after Friday I now know that I'm more like the cowardly lion than I'd like to admit.
I want what the cowardly lion wanted - courage. I don't want your run of the mill courage. I want the courage that I saw exhibited by the Lake Havasu Telesis girls basketball team.
Before Telesis took on our Kingman Academy of Learning, I did some research on the league's Web site and saw that Telesis was 0-1. The Web site reported a score of 75-0, but that couldn't have been right, could it?
Unfortunately, it was correct. And it is correct that KAOL beat them 68-0 on Friday.
Stephen Crane wrote "The Red Badge of Courage" in 1895. If he had seen the play of Telesis on Friday, he would have never written his book and would have allowed someone in the year 2007 to write it. It was truly as remarkable a show of courage that I have ever seen take place on a basketball court or any athletic field. Ever.
After losing their opening game to Quartzsite Scholars, I am left to wonder what was going on in the minds of those young ladies. Did they consider quitting? I hope not. The Telesis Tigers have a lot to offer to those who witness their games.
I do know that they aren't quitters. Telesis did not lay down one bit against KAOL. They kept trying and trying. I only saw one moment where one of their players got frustrated. Her coach quickly took the time to talk to her, and that was the end of that.I have to look at myself through the mirror that the Telesis team has held up in front of me. Do I have what it takes to come off of a 75-0 drubbing and be willing to face another one?
As I begin another trip around the bright yellow orb in the sky, I have discovered that I need a dose of Telesis-like courage.When my boss hands me that assignment that presses me down to the core, I will remember Telesis and what they have given me, even if they don't realize it.
I'll leave our cozy little confines here at the Miner and face the challenge as if I was trying to score a basket.
I have to do this. Though Telesis scored nothing, they didn't try for nothing. It is my moral responsibility to the Telesis Lady Tigers that their effort on Friday never goes down in history as nothing.
After all, they gave me the best birthday present I could have ever asked for.
Shawn Byrne
Miner Sports Writer

Sunday, December 9, 2007

Weekly Schedule December 10th – December 14th

This is our schedule for the week ending December 14th, 2007. It is important to remember that these schedules are not etched in stone. Our firm belief in adjusting our curriculum to meet the needs of students sometimes causes slight changes. It is important to note that ample time is given in class to complete most assignments. There are occasional projects, spanning a week or more, that will require students to work outside of class. There will be no more than one of these per month. If you have any questions, please contact me at extension 38.

1st Year Social Studies (Period 1 & 3) – This week we will continue our study of the colonies. Students will also be assigned a biography of one of the following people: John Smith, William Penn, Lord Baltimore, Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson, or James Oglethorpe. The biography must be typed, Times New Roman font, double spaced, with standard margins. The biography is due December 20th.

Monday: We will continue to compare and contrast the Magna Carta, Mayflower Compact, Declaration of Independence, and the Bill of Rights.

Tuesday: We will be studying the New England Colonies. The New England Colonies of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Rhode Island all share Puritan roots. This program examines the origins and beliefs of the Puritan religion. It also explains why Puritans were persecuted in England and why they wanted to settle in America. The circumstances surrounding the creation of each New England colony is detailed, but particular attention is given to the Pilgrims of Plymouth and the founding of Massachusetts. The many ways that Puritanism manifested itself in New England are described and the “Triangle Trade” is explained. There will be two worksheets and a short quiz.

Wednesday: We will be studying the Middle Colonies. This program tells the stories of the Middle Colonies of New York, New Jersey, Delaware, and Pennsylvania. This region, which lies between the southern colonies and New England, was originally colonized by settlers from Holland and Sweden and was later seized by England so it has a distinct history. Slavery was not a big factor in the middle colonies, nor was Puritanism. Special emphasis in this program is given to William Penn, a man whose influence was felt in the development of three different colonies. There will be two worksheets and a short quiz.

Thursday: We will be studying the Southern Colonies. The Southern Colonies of Virginia, Maryland, Georgia, and North and South Carolina were very distinct from England’s other American colonies because their economic success was based on slave labor. This program tells the stories of these colonies. Beginning with England’s first attempts at colonization on Roanoke Island in the 1580s, this program examines the motivations for founding each southern colony. The problems colonists faced in settling new territory and interactions with American Indians are detailed. The role of slavery, conflicts with Spain, colonial exports, and methods of government are also examined. There will be two worksheets and a short quiz.

2nd Year Social Studies (Period 2 & 4) – We will be studying Mesopotamia and begin studying Ancient Egypt.

Monday: We will view “Mesopotamia: Trade Routes and Transportation.” For the Sumerians, the Tigris River served as an important early trade route. See how they traveled by river and overland to trade with India and Egypt. Then examine how technological advances, such as the cart, facilitated transporting people and goods.

Tuesday: We will be studying the Code of Hammurabi. The Code of Hammurabi (also known as Codex Hammurabi) is one of the earliest and best preserved law codes from ancient Babylon, created ca. 1760 BC (middle chronology). It was enacted by the sixth Babylonian king, Hammurabi.[1] Earlier collections of laws include the codex of Ur-Nammu, king of Ur (ca. 2050 BC), the Codex of Eshnunna (ca. 1930 BC) and the codex of Lipit-Ishtar of Isin (ca. 1870 BC).[2]

Wednesday: We will be viewing “Ancient Egypt: The Gift of the Nile.” Three thousand years before the rise of the Roman Empire, the Nile River gave birth to one of the most wondrous civilizations ever to grace the earth-Ancient Egypt. Students explore the colossal tombs and temples of the pharaohs. They learn how the Egyptians built mountains of stone to honor dead kings and queens and protect their mummies forever. Students meet Amun-Ra (Rê), the sun god, and Horus, the protector of kings. Ancient Egyptian civilization finally passed into history, but the river remains.

Thursday: We will view “Great Egyptians.” Gender, age, and cunning were behind three of ancient Egypt's most intriguing rulers — and left indelible marks on the history of the country. Hatshepsut: Queen Who Became King — She declared herself King of Egypt and got away with it. Peek into her incredibly successful 22-year reign. Tutankhamen: Mystery of the Boy King — Victim of foul play? What happened to the 11-year-old king whose life was a clash between childhood and kingship? Cleopatra: Last of the Pharaohs — Discover how Cleopatra used shrewd political instincts to seduce the Roman Empire into restoring Egypt's greatness. We will decide “Who Killed King Tut?”

Health –

Friday: We will be examining ways to resolve conflict.

Friday, December 7, 2007

Robert Frost: The Road Not Taken (1915)

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth.

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same.

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I-
-I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

This poem is usually interpreted as an assertion of individualism, but critic Lawrence Thompson has argued that it is a slightly mocking satire on a perennially hesitant walking partner of Frost's who always wondered what would have happened if he had chosen their path differently.

What evidence can you find in the poem to support each of these views?

Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Second Year Tablet Project

“A wormhole, a wormhole, a wormhole,” shouted Professor Timskink, “Run for you lives!”
You look over at the professor, too late, you’ve been sucked in! As your vision is blurred by the many diverse and strange images that flash before your eyes, you realize that you have left your time behind. The professor had been experimenting with time travel and you have become his first victim, or subject depending on your viewpoint.

You have landed back in Ancient Sumer, where they are creating a written language.

Your assignment is to create an original alphabet (that in no way resembles the written language you know), create a key (see below for an example), and a three dimensional tablet that has one of the following bits of wisdom on it:

1. A child of five would understand this. Send someone to fetch a child of five

2. I never forget a face, but in your case I'll be glad to make an exception.

3. Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.

4. When you come to a fork in the road ... Take it.

5. We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.

Your grade will be based on imagination and creativity. The project is due Thursday December 20th, 2007.

Sunday, December 2, 2007

Weekly Schedule December 3rd – December 7th

This is our schedule for the week ending December 7th, 2007. It is important to remember that these schedules are not etched in stone. Our firm belief in adjusting our curriculum to meet the needs of students sometimes causes slight changes. It is important to note that ample time is given in class to complete most assignments. There are occasional projects, spanning a week or more, that will require students to work outside of class. There will be no more than one of these per month. If you have any questions, please contact me at extension 38.

1st Year Social Studies (Period 1 & 3) – This week we will continue our study of the colonies. We will take a brief break to remember the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Monday, December 3rd: We will view “The New England Colonists: From Pilgrims to Puritans”. We will have a worksheet due Tuesday and a short quiz.

Tuesday, December 4th: We will compare and contrast the Magna Carta, Mayflower Compact, Declaration of Independence, and the Bill of Rights.

Wednesday, December 5th and Thursday, December 6th: We will view Tora, Tora, Tora!

2nd Year Social Studies (Period 2 & 4) – We will be studying Mesopotamia. We will take a brief break to remember the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Monday, December 3rd: We will view “Mesopotamia: From Nomads to Farmers.” We will discuss how and why the Sumerian civilization developed from many nomadic groups. We will complete a worksheet and have a quiz.

Tuesday, December 4th: We will view “Mesopotamia: The Development of Written Language.” We will discuss the importance of the written language and why the Sumerians developed one. There will be a worksheet due Wednesday. There will also be a new project assigned.

Wednesday, December 5th and Thursday, December 6th: We will view Tora, Tora, Tora!

Health –

Friday, December 7th: We will be examining violence prevention.

Saturday, November 24, 2007

Weekly Schedule November 26th – November 30th

This is our schedule for the week ending November 30th, 2007. It is important to remember that these schedules are not etched in stone. Our firm belief in adjusting our curriculum to meet the needs of students sometimes causes slight changes. It is important to note that ample time is given in class to complete most assignments. There are occasional projects, spanning a week or more, that will require students to work outside of class. There will be no more than one of these per month. If you have any questions, please contact me at extension 38.

1st Year Social Studies (Period 1 & 3) – This week we will begin our study of the colonization of the United States after a brief pause to learn to work with Microsoft’s PowerPoint.

Monday, November 26th: We will create a PowerPoint called the Animal Alphabet. Students will create the slide show by finding an animal to represent each letter in the alphabet.

Tuesday, November 27th: Students will work on their Explorer Poster.

Wednesday, November 28th: Students will study the early English colonies. They will have a worksheet that is due Thursday and a short quiz.

Thursday, November 29th: Students will study the French settlements in the Louisiana Territory. They will have a worksheet that is due Monday and a short quiz.

2nd Year Social Studies (Period 2 & 4) – We have completed our survey of how civilizations come to be and we will now begin our study of three specific civilizations. First on our list is Ancient China.

Monday, November 26th: We will be studying the geography, traditional religions, and beliefs of the Ancient Chinese. They will have a worksheet that is due Tuesday and a short quiz.

Tuesday, November 27th: We will be studying life in the capital cities of Ancient China. They will have a worksheet that is due Wednesday and a short quiz.

Wednesday, November 28th: We will be studying the changes in Chinese government from dynasty to communism. They will have a worksheet that is due Thursday and a short quiz.

Thursday, November 29th: We will be studying Mesopotamia, specifically how a nomadic people became a civilization. They will have a worksheet that is due Monday and a short quiz.

Health –

Friday, November 30th: We will be examining cultural differences.

Monday, November 19, 2007

Extra Credit Assignments!!!

First Years:

60 Points:

Imagine that you are a European explorer. You have arrived in the New World and your King has requested a report. You are to write a letter that outlines what it is you have found in the New World. What are the native people like? Did you find new animals, food, weapons, and riches? What was the land like? What was your journey like? Write a three page letter to your king that begins with: “Your Royal Majesty,”

60 Points:

Imagine that you are a Native American and Europeans have just landed on your coast line. The Chief of your tribe has sent you to gain information about the visitors. Write a three page letter back to your Chief describing what you have seen and heard.

Second Years:

60 Points:

Imagine that you are an archeologist and you are looking for the lost city of King Rupsuptub. His castle is located in the deepest, darkest jungles of South America. Write a three page story that describes your journey. You can bring your friends, your family; you can even drag Mr. Lawslo along.

100 Points:

Recreate an Egyptian artifact as a three dimensional model. Make a sarcophagus, a head-dress, a royal staff, the sphinx, a chariot, virtually anything Egyptian that you can think of!

All extra credit assignments are due Monday, November 26th.

Thursday, November 15, 2007

Explorer Project Due November 29th

First year students, you will answer this Essential Question:

Which Voyage of Discovery (1200-1800) would your class, as a whole, most like to have been part of? Why?

Scenario:
“So many voyages, just one trip!” said Professor Acme…
Your class has the opportunity to go on a fantastic field trip. Using a time machine, just invented by the ACME Time Travel Company for this special journey, all of you will be going back in time to be guests on a voyage with a famous explorer from 1200 to the 1800. Working with a partner, you will help your class decide which voyage you all would most like to be part of.

Task
In order for your class to make an informed decision as to which of the many voyages you all could be part of you will present your findings to the class. Important: your task is not to try to persuade your class that your voyage was the best, but rather provide great information that will help your whole class decide which voyage you all would most have liked to be part of.
Answer the following questions about your voyage:
1. Who was the leader of the voyage?
2. What country did he sail for?
3. When did he sail?
4. What were some the leader’s characteristics? (example: kind, cruel)
5. What was the purpose of the voyage?
6. What were some significant events that occurred during the voyage?
7. What was the outcome of the voyage?
8. What route did he take?

Poster Requirements

Size: 22” x 28”

Will include:
1. All the above information
2. 2 Pictures
3. A Map

Project Due November 29th

Sunday, November 11, 2007

Weekly Schedule November 12th – November 16th

This is our schedule for the week ending November 16th, 2007. It is important to remember that these schedules are not etched in stone. Our firm belief in adjusting our curriculum to meet the needs of students sometimes causes slight changes. It is important to note that ample time is given in class to complete most assignments. There are occasional projects, spanning a week or more, that will require students to work outside of class. There will be no more than one of these per month. If you have any questions, please contact me at extension 38.

1st Year Social Studies (Period 1 & 3) – We will continue in our study of the Age of Exploration.

Monday, November 12th: We will be studying Samuel de Champlain and his journey to the New World. We will have a worksheet, due Tuesday, and a short quiz.

Tuesday, November 13th: We will be studying French Exploration of the Mississippi. We will have a worksheet, due Wednesday, and a short quiz.

Wednesday, November 14th: We will be taking our final test on the exploration of North America. Students will also be receiving instructions for their project on explorers.

Thursday, November 15th: Students will have time to work on their project.

2nd Year Social Studies (Period 2 & 4) – Presently we are covering how civilizations begin, peak, and fade. This brief survey is preparing students for more in-depth study of several prominent civilizations and will also provide assistance for their research paper (see blog entry) that is due November 15th.

Monday, November 12th: We will be working on our research paper.

Tuesday, November 13th: We will be working on our research paper.

Wednesday, November 14th: We will be working on our research paper.

Thursday, November 15th: Research paper due.

Health –

Friday, November 16th: We will be examining personal safety and basic first aid.

Saturday, November 10, 2007

Research Paper Update

Second year students will be given every day this week in order to complete their Ancient Civilization assignment. Assignment is due Thursday November 15th.

Sunday, November 4, 2007

Weekly Schedule November 5th – November 9th

This is our schedule for the week ending November 9th, 2007. It is important to remember that these schedules are not etched in stone. Our firm belief in adjusting our curriculum to meet the needs of students sometimes causes slight changes. It is important to note that ample time is given in class to complete most assignments. There are occasional projects, spanning a week or more, that will require students to work outside of class. There will be no more than one of these per month. If you have any questions, please contact me at extension 38.

1st Year Social Studies (Period 1 & 3) – We will continue our study of the Age of Exploration. The Age of Exploration was a period from the early 15th century and continuing into the early 17th century, during which European ships traveled around the world in search of new trading routes and partners to feed burgeoning capitalism in Europe. They also were in search of trading goods such as gold, silver and spices. In the process, Europeans encountered peoples and mapped lands previously unknown to them. Among the most famous explorers of the period were Christopher Columbus, Vasco da Gama, and Ferdinand Magellan.
The Age of Exploration was rooted in new technologies and ideas growing out of the Renaissance. These included advances in cartography, navigation, firepower and shipbuilding. Many people wanted to find a route to Asia through the west of Europe. The most important development was the invention of first the carrack and then caravel in Portugal. These vessels evolved from medieval European designs with a fruitful combination of Mediterranean and North Sea designs and the addition of some Arabic elements. They were the first ships that could leave the relatively placid and calm Mediterranean and sail safely on the open Atlantic.

Monday, November 5th: We will be studying Christopher Columbus and his journey to the New World. We will have a worksheet, due Tuesday, and a short quiz.

Tuesday, November 6th: We will be studying Spanish Exploration of North America. We will have a worksheet, due Wednesday, and a short quiz.

Wednesday, November 7th: We will be studying English Exploration of North America. We will have a worksheet, due Thursday, and a short quiz.

Thursday, November 8th: We will be studying French Exploration of North America. We will have a worksheet, due Monday, and a short quiz.

2nd Year Social Studies (Period 2 & 4) – Presently we are covering how civilizations begin, peak, and fade. This brief survey is preparing students for more in-depth study of several prominent civilizations and will also provide assistance for their research paper (see blog entry) that is due November 15th.

Monday and Tuesday, November 5th and 6th: We will be creating a Civilization Pie. Students will determine the “ingredients” required to “bake” a civilization. Students will also be given an opportunity to continue working on their research paper.

Wednesday, November 7th: We will be studying the expansion that is needed for a civilization to become an empire: Rome’s Conquests—Traces the path and battles of Roman legions in their quest to conquer the world. Peter the Great—Looks at how this Russian leader brought Western influence and power to his struggling nation. Rise of Nationalism—Examines how ideas replaced wars in Russia’s battle against its oppressive czars. Communism & the Soviet Union—Shows the fall of czarist Russia and the birth of the first communist state.

Thursday, November 8th: We will be studying leadership: Prosperity and Decline traces the beginning of the Roman Empire and explores why the empire succeeded and why it ultimately fell. In Rome’s Wake discusses the chaos in Europe following the fall of the Roman Empire, the rise of feudalism during the Middle Ages, and the impact of the Crusades on Europe and the Middle East. The Politics of The Prince describes the political climate during the Renaissance in Italy and the political philosophy of Niccolò Machiavelli, who identified the qualities of a leader in a famous book called The Prince. Emperor Napoleon is the story of Napoleon, who created the French Empire but was defeated by other leaders of Europe.

Health –

Friday, November 9th: In preparation for conferences next week; students will complete their self-evaluation.

Thursday, November 1, 2007

Research Paper Update

To differentiate instruction is to recognize students varying background knowledge, readiness, language, preferences in learning, interests, and to react responsively. Differentiated instruction is a process to approach teaching and learning for students of differing abilities in the same class. The intent of differentiating instruction is to maximize each student’s growth and individual success by meeting each student where he or she is, and assisting in the learning process. As a result, it has become necessary to adjust the due date of the 2nd year research paper to November 15th.
This is a critical assignment for your student. Students have varying degrees of resources available to them; so a trip to the library (maybe more than one) might be required to provide your student with every opportunity to succeed.
Thank you for your support!

Sunday, October 28, 2007

2nd Year Research Paper

Due Date: Thursday, November 8th 2007


You are to write, in your own words, a research paper on one of the following civilizations:

  • Byzantium
  • Ancient Egypt
  • Ancient India
  • Ancient China

Your paper should cover the following aspects (if applicable) of the civilizations: Social stratification and ranking, trade or exchange networks, the presence of luxury and exotic goods (such as the Baltic amber trade), metallurgy, craft specialization, control of food as in agriculture or pastoralism, high population density, monumental architecture, writing system, calendar, centralized rule, military conquests, and armed military force. You must also select one leader from this civilization and include a mini-biography.

Your paper should be 5 pages long with two pictures that do not take up more than ¼ of the page it’s on. The paper must be typed in Times New Roman font, 12 pt. font size, double spaced, with standard margins, and justified alignment.

You will also be required to make a Power Point that is 10 slides long. Each slide must have a picture. You will be judged on creativity. All of the information should come from your research paper.
Under student links you will find a number of resources that will be beneficial.

Weekly Schedule October 29th – November 2nd

This is our schedule for the week ending November 2nd, 2007. It is important to remember that these schedules are not etched in stone. Our firm belief in adjusting our curriculum to meet the needs of students sometimes causes slight changes. It is important to note that ample time is given in class to complete most assignments. There are occasional projects, spanning a week or more, that will require students to work outside of class. There will be no more than one of these per month. If you have any questions, please contact me at extension 38.

1st Year Social Studies (Period 1 & 3) – Presently we are covering Native American Cultures. We will begin our study of the Age of Exploration on Thursday.

Monday, October 29th: We will be studying Native American Tribes of the Desert Southwest. Our primary focus will be on the Anasazi. We will have a worksheet, due Tuesday, and a short quiz.

Tuesday, October 30th: We will be studying Native American Tribes of the Pacific Northwest. Our primary focus will be on clans and their importance. We will have a worksheet, due Wednesday, and a short quiz.

Wednesday, October 31st: We will be taking a test on Native American cultures. Time permitting; students will be listening to Orson Welles and the Mercury Theaters presentation of War of the Worlds. Interestingly, several local radio stations, KNTR - KRZY - KZUL - KRRK, will be broadcasting a local version of the program Wednesday night and there is a Grand Canyon Reader book available (The Aliens are Coming!) that Mrs. Silvey and Mrs. Mills both have in their libraries.

Thursday, October 18th: The Age of Exploration begins with our exploring how maps were not as reliable for Christopher Columbus and friends as they are now. Students will create a map of the school from memory. I will select a few, make copies for the class, and we will determine how accurate they are by searching for a hidden treasure.

2nd Year Social Studies (Period 2 & 4) – Presently we are covering how civilizations begin, peak, and fade. This brief survey is preparing students for more in-depth study of several prominent civilizations and will also provide assistance for their research paper (see blog entry) that is due November 8th.

Monday and Tuesday, October 29th & 30th: We will be studying how the human race began to develop civilization. Our study will include the study of primitive hominids like Neanderthals. Work is due on Wednesday; this work will include several short essays.

Wednesday and Thursday, October 31st & November 1st: We will study what makes up a civilization and how some rise to power and become empires. Rome will be prominently featured. We will also be creating a “recipe” for our own “civilization pie.” Our “pie” should be finished no later than Monday.

Health –

Friday, November 2nd: We will begin working on a project concerning the effect that electronic accessories (e-cessories) have had on our culture as a whole and each of us individually. Students will select the device they think has been the most important. Six to eight students will be asked to participate in a pilot program that is being sponsored by Microsoft. This project will include some after school work building their own website. Students will be given extra credit for their participation beyond the essay.

Saturday, October 20, 2007

Intermediate Worklist

The intermediate worklist is a tool used to help the students know what and when daily assigmnents are due. It is a tracking system they use every day. The teachers will initial the assignments once they are done and corrected, if necessary. If a teacher's initial is not on the assignment, the student either needs to do the assignment or correct the assignment. The students are expected to write their assignments on the worklist every day. At the end of the week, parents are expected to sign the back of the worklist and then return it Monday so the students can receive their pay checks. If the worklist is NOT signed, they do NOT receive their work money.

PARENTS, PLEASE SIGN THE WORKLIST EVERY WEEKEND!

We, the staff, are really trying to help the students become responsible working students.

You, at home, may need to remind your child to show you his/her worklist to be signed. We hope this will help you understand the importance of your signature on their worklists.

Weekly Schedule October 22nd - 26th

This is our schedule for the week ending October 26th, 2007. It is important to remember that these schedules are not etched in stone. Our firm belief in adjusting our curriculum to meet the needs of students sometimes causes slight changes. If you have any questions, please contact me at extension 38.

1st Year Social Studies (Period 1 & 3) – We have completed our study of U.S. Geography, though we still have a test on Tuesday for state capitals. Students can practice for the test on the Sheppard Software website (http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/). We are now beginning our study of indigenous peoples of North America.

Monday, October 22nd: Students will view Ancient Americans: Mayas and Aztecs and begin a worksheet.

Tuesday, October 23rd: Students will complete worksheet, discuss the importance of these cultures and their influence, and then take a short quiz.

Wednesday, October 24th: Students will view People of the Forest, discuss way in which knowledge was passed orally, read Native American stories and write a "review", and take a short quiz.

Thursday, October 25th: Students will view People of the Plains, discuss the tribes of the American northeast, and complete a worksheet.

2nd Year Social Studies (Period 2 & 4) – Presently we are covering World Geography.

Monday, October 22nd: Students will turn in their worksheet on Africa. We will begin working on Asia.

Tuesday, October 23rd: We will continue working on Asia. Worksheet is due Wednesday.

Wednesday, October 24th: We will view World History: Pre-History and begin a research paper on one of the following civilizations: Byzantium, Ancient Egypt, Ancient India, or Ancient China. Students will select the civilization that most interests them. They will also be required to make a Power Point that uses the information they gathered in their research. The research paper must be 5 typed (Times New Roman, 12pt., double spaced) pages and must be typed in class. They will be given several full class periods in which to complete their project. The paper is due Thursday November 8th.

Thursday, October 25th: Work on research paper.

Health –

Friday, October 26th: We will be discussing peer pressure and how to deal with it.

Additional Resources:

Dealing with Peer Pressure
Native Americans

Thursday, October 18, 2007

Discovery Education Streaming

Discovery Education streaming integrates seamlessly into any curriculum with 4,000 full-length videos segmented into 40,000 content-specific clips. Today, 1 million educators and 30 million students in more than half of U.S. schools learn with Discovery Education streaming.

Discovery Education streaming Empowers Educators to expand students' horizons using new multimedia content for all subjects from leading educational publishers.

Discovery Education streaming is the only digital video-based learning resource scientifically proven to increase student achievement.

In my classroom we use Discovery Streaming and its many valuable resources every day. One really great thing about this program is that you can access some of the resources that we are using from your own home. If a student misses a day, there is a good chance that some of the material will be available for viewing online. Just look to the links on the left side of my blog and find the title that meets what your student needs. If you don’t know how to use it, just ask your student!

If you're not sure what we are doing; just look at the weekly schedule that I post right here each week.

Sunday, October 14, 2007

Weekly Schedule October 15th – October 19th

This is our schedule for the week ending October 19th, 2007. It is important to remember that these schedules are not etched in stone. Our firm belief in adjusting our curriculum to meet the needs of students sometimes causes slight changes. If you have any questions, please contact me at extension 38.

1st Year Social Studies (Period 1 & 3) – Presently we are covering U.S. Geography.

Monday, October 15th: Worksheet covering the Pacific West region of the United States. Worksheet covers state capitals, climates, environments, economic activities, and location on a map. Students will have about 30 minutes in class to complete worksheet. The worksheet is due Tuesday. The Geography Project for 1st Period is due.

Tuesday, October 16th: Worksheet covering the capitals for all 50 states. Required information includes the capital, region, and population of each state. We will be having a test on Thursday on the capitals. Worksheet is due Thursday prior to test.

Wednesday, October 17th: Worksheet covering the capitals for all 50 states. Required information includes the capital, region, and population of each state. We will be having a test next Monday on the capitals. Worksheet is due Monday prior to test. The Geography Project for 3rd period is due.

Thursday, October 18th: Test on state capitals.

2nd Year Social Studies (Period 2 & 4) – Presently we are covering World Geography.

Monday, October 15th: Finish worksheets covering Europe. Worksheet is due Tuesday.

Tuesday, October 16th: Worksheet covering central and southern Africa. The Geography Project for 2nd period is due. The worksheet is due Monday.

Wednesday, October 17th: Worksheet covering eastern and northern Africa. The worksheet is due Monday.

Thursday, October 18th: Worksheet covering western Africa. The worksheet is due Monday. The Geography Project for 4th period is due.

Health –

Friday, October 19th: We will be addressing anger and its relationship with good health practices.

Additional Resources:

Interactive geography activities (GREAT SITE): http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/

Tiger Time!

The Intermediate team has started a new program designed to assist students that are struggling in certain subjects and reward those that are succeeding. Students will have an extra hour to work on the subject that is proving the most challenging to them each Friday with the teacher of that subject. There are also activities for those students that have completed all of their work. We are doing this in this way in order to make available embedded time within the school week to provide students greater opportunity to fulfill their requirements. It is important to embed this time within the school day because we send the message to the student that this is important, not an afterthought (like AFTER school). In today’s high stakes world of education it is important to provide students every opportunity to succeed; especially in light of the ever increasing load students are expected to become proficient with.

Thursday, October 11, 2007

Reminder

Don't forget about your projects!
1st Period - Monday
2nd Period - Tuesday
3rd Period - Wednesday
4th Period - Thursday

Monday, October 8, 2007

Extra Points Anyone?

Here is the extra-credit assignment for Intermediate Students:

Imagine that you are the pilot of an airplane. You will depart from Los Angeles, California and arrive in Boston, Massachusetts. Along the way you will need to change planes in St. Paul, Minnesota. So your flight plan is Los Angeles to St. Paul to Boston. In one page or more describe what it is you will see out of the windows. Include information about the landforms, cities, geographic characteristics, and famous landmarks. If you have been on an airplane you know that pilots will often point out interesting things along the route; what would you point out. You need to be specific, not that you saw mountains and rivers, which rivers, which mountains, which cities.

This assignment will be worth 50 extra credit points.

Thank You, Mr. Gates

Intermediate students, along with some Academy students, are going to be taking part in a pilot program sponsored by Microsoft Corporation. Parents may not know that Microsoft has a great number of resources and programs available for students. Our participation in this program will be providing Microsoft with information about how to make it better, we will be earning our school Microsoft’s web designing software Expression Web, and students will gain valuable experience in web page designing.

Essential Question:

"What electronic device (e-cessory) has had the greatest impact upon your life or the life of your friends, family, or community?”

Learning Tasks:

Students will identify an e-cessory to research and create a Website to communicate their learning. The content of the research will include identifying four inventions or events in history that have led to the need for and development of their chosen e-cessory.

Friday, October 5, 2007

Feedback

I’m looking for feedback on whether anyone is visiting this blog. Please leave me a comment and let me know what you think.

Special note: Students check back Monday and find a special blog extra credit assignment.

Monday, October 1, 2007

Monument Project

Due Dates:

1st Period: October 15th, 2007

2nd Period: October 16th, 2007

3rd Period: October 17th, 2007

4th Period: October 18th, 2007

Requirements:

1. 1st year Intermediate students must select an American Monument; 2nd year must select a World Monument (not in the United States).

2. Product must be 3 dimensional

3. Base must be 12” x 12”; height must not exceed 18”

4. Project must include a 2 page (typed, double-spaced, Times New Roman font) report that includes the following information:
a. Location
b. History
c. Construction Materials
d. Method of Construction

5. Some examples of monuments (students may select from this list, but their choices are only limited by geography: 1st years – American; 2nd year - NOT American)

a. American:

i. Arlington National Cemetery
ii. Independence Hall
iii. Korean War Memorial
iv. Jefferson Memorial
v. Lincoln Memorial
vi. Mount Rushmore
vii. Vietnam Veterans Memorial

b. World:

i. Machu Picchu
ii. Pyramid of Giza
iii. Taj Mahal
iv. St. Peter’s Basilica
v. Great Wall of China
vi. Coliseum
vii. Easter Island Statues

Sunday, September 30, 2007

Weekly Schedule October 1st - 5th

This is our schedule for the week ending October 5th, 2007. It is important to remember that these schedules are not etched in stone. Our firm belief in adjusting our curriculum to meet the needs of students sometimes causes slight changes. If you have any questions, please contact me at extension 38.

1st Year Social Studies (Period 1 & 3) – Presently we are covering U.S. Geography.

Monday, October 1st: Worksheet covering the Midwest and Great Plains region of the United States. Worksheet covers state capitals, climates, environments, economic activities, and location on a map. Students will have about 30 minutes in class to complete worksheet. The worksheet is due Tuesday.

Tuesday, October 2nd: Worksheet covering the South Central United States. The worksheet is due Wednesday.

Wednesday, October 3rd: Worksheet covering the Mountain West region of the United States. The worksheet is due Thursday.

Thursday, October 4th: Worksheet covering the Pacific West region of the United States. The worksheet is due Monday.

2nd Year Social Studies (Period 2 & 4) – Presently we are covering World Geography.

Monday, October 1st: Worksheet covering eastern and northern South America. Worksheet covers capitals, climates, environments, economic activities, and location on a map. Students will have about 30 minutes in class to complete worksheet. The worksheet is due Wednesday.

Tuesday, October 2nd: Worksheet covering western South America. The worksheet is due Wednesday.

Wednesday, October 3rd: Worksheet covering Eastern Europe. The worksheet is due Monday.

Thursday, October 4th: Worksheet covering Western Europe. The worksheet is due Monday.

Health –

Friday, October 5th: We will be addressing anger and its relationship with good health practices.

Additional Resources:

World Geography: http://cyberschoolbus.un.org/

Interactive geography activities (GREAT SITE): http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/

Saturday, September 29, 2007

Welcome!

Thus our community begins. I will post a weekly assignment list that will allow students and parents to keep up-to-date on what we are doing in class. Since communication is what this blog is about, please feel free to post comments. Please remember that students will be accessing this site, therefore I ask that comments or questions be posted with this in mind.
Questions or comments of a more personal nature regarding your student should be directed in person.